Slave Codes: Crash Course Black American History #4

Slave codes were a method of protecting the investment of white enslavers in the Colonies by restricting the lives of enslaved people in almost every imaginable way. The codes restricted enslaved people’s ability to move around, or engage in commerce that could make them financially independent – they restricted the very opportunities that would allow them to live with even relative freedom. Today, we’ll learn about how Colonies put laws in place to restrict the movement and freedoms of both enslaved people and free Black people alike.

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VIDEO SOURCES

-Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998).
-John Hope Franklin, From Slavery to Freedom: A History of Negro Americans (New York: Knopf, 1967).
-Claude M. Steele, Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do (Reprint Edition ed. 2011).
-Black Codes and Slave Codes, Colonial, , Oxford African American Studies Center , http://oxfordaasc.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195301731.001.0001/acref-9780195301731-e-44570.
-Peter H. Wood, Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 through the Stono Rebellion (New York: W.W. Norton, 1974).
-Jennifer L. Morgan, Partus sequitur ventrem: Law, Race, and Reproduction in Colonial Slavery, 22 Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism 1–17 (2018).

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